Interview with Edward J. Carpenter

Our reporter met with Mr. Carpenter at the patio belonging to the renowned Tavola Calda at the candidate’s wishes. His campaign consists of three parts, according to his website, and when asked what he saw as most important of these parts, he admitted to it being Public Safety. The other parts are Infrastructure and the delivery of necessary services, as well as promoting an environment that attracts and retains business.The retired police NYPD officer tells us that for him, “it all ties back into that: If we can give people what they need, good homes, work and a sense of community we are all better for it.”

Seemingly a fairly calm and collected man, at ease with answering the questions coming his way with what appears to be a great volume of data in his mind,  Carpenter is pushing for community policing programs and more training for our local law enforcement, planning to shift those allocated funds from things like tactical swat vehicles to outreach programs, needle exchanges as well as making counselling more available. 

The candidate seemed to take some amusement in our reporter calling his suggested method softer than the ways of policing currently in place, assuming they were being seen as easier. However, for clarification, in this case, softer means friendlier.

He warned that it isn’t going to be an easy change, to enforce his suggested new community policing act. And that it’s likely that people are not going to be happy to answer questions about their race and gender when a sheriff [or police officer] pulls them over. However, he is quick to point out that “It’s necessary to prove in plain english and numbers that people of color are being disproportionately targeted, and those numbers need to be recorded.”

Of course, with what is currently going on in our nation, and has spread across much of the world, our reporter saw it as important to follow up with questions regarding Mr.Carpenter’s plans for our local law enforcement in comparison to the Defund the Police Movement. This is his response: “ I wouldn’t say [it is] part of the movement. We still need law and law enforcement. But yes, I support defunding as a matter of public safety.” He later went on to specify how he wished to see some of the current spending being redirected to organized steering committees for each neighborhood comprised of pro-active residents. In his own words, “sort of a Social Outreach Worker.” 

Although this candidate’s main focus seems to be very much on the law enforcement side of things, as should perhaps be expected of an ex cop, he also shared some intricately detailed plans on his vision for Clifton Forge’s sustainable future, which unfortunately could not all be included in this article to ensure our readers’ attention remain with us. 

“Our environment plays heavily into my plans for supporting our local economy,  Nothing happens without money, and Clifton Forge is one of the most naturally beautiful places I’ve ever seen.” Ed, who is born and raised in New York, seems to have a very economical eye on the environment, and also expresses that his idea is to follow the governor’s lead in moving to green energy as a way to keep our natural spaces pristine and as a way to more effectively deliver Services and goods to our city. 

If elected, he intends to court Dominion Energy and Appalachian Power, in hope that they would consider building one of their new wind farms off our coast, stating he wants our people to benefit from the growth industry and jobs green energy offers.

Of course this sort of plan often comes with worries and questions from the public, one being a concern for the natural beauty of the area. But the mayoral candidate has told our reporter there is no need to worry, comparing the structures that need to be raised to implement his plans for a greener Clifton Forge to that of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, in that people were not in favour of it at first, but that it now is a major tourist attraction. However, we need to point out that the iconic tower was built as an entrance to the Exposition Universelle 1889 and was to be disassembled in 1909. It also never had any intended function besides that of a monument to art and engineering, which we hope isn’t the case with the wind turbines and solar stations the candidate is proposing for our town. 

Again, he points to the benefit for local industry and economics to implement green energy as well as a zero waste policy, claiming it will create more well paying jobs. And, as a last statement regarding his environmental policies, providing the business community buys into his plans, he hopes to be able to go fully green somewhere between 2035 and 2050, and sees that smaller goals, like coming up to emission standards, can be reached as early as 2035. 

And there, dear readers, you have an actual goal to hold Mr. Carpenter to, should you vote him in as the next mayor.

Mr. Carpenter’s social policies seem to heavily tie into those of public safety, and again points to a need for solutions that are indigenous to our neighborhoods and our community. We must bolster the programs we already have in place and give more hands to help. But he also states that to make this part of his scheme work, growth industries like green energy and tourism bring in a much needed cash flow.

The interview had to be cut short in the end, as Mr. Carpenter is a busy man and seemed in a hurry elsewhere. However, the Telegraph did manage to get a hold of him for a few final questions regarding his hiring policies and his stance on lgbtqia questions.

In regards to the queer comunity, he let us know that  “As a bisexual man I am my thought are never far from the protection and rights our community has fought so hard for.. I will always support our community in whatever  way I’m able, we’ve made considerable  strides towards equality. But we’re not done yet. ” And he went on to further claim that he has a fair mix in his campaign team and [that] if he is elected to office I will continue hiring people who can offer perspectives that engender equity.

Our reporter met with Mr. Carpenter at the patio belonging to the renowned Tavola Calda at the candidate’s wishes. His campaign consists of three parts, according to his website, and when asked what he saw as most important of these parts, he admitted to it being Public Safety. The other parts are Infrastructure and the delivery of necessary services, as well as promoting an environment that attracts and retains business.The retired police NYPD officer tells us that for him, “it all ties back into that: If we can give people what they need, good homes, work and a sense of community we are all better for it.”

Seemingly a fairly calm and collected man, at ease with answering the questions coming his way with what appears to be a great volume of data in his mind,  Carpenter is pushing for community policing programs and more training for our local law enforcement, planning to shift those allocated funds from things like tactical swat vehicles to outreach programs, needle exchanges as well as making counselling more available. 

The candidate seemed to take some amusement in our reporter calling his suggested method softer than the ways of policing currently in place, assuming they were being seen as easier. However, for clarification, in this case, softer means friendlier.

He warned that it isn’t going to be an easy change, to enforce his suggested new community policing act. And that it’s likely that people are not going to be happy to answer questions about their race and gender when a sheriff [or police officer] pulls them over. However, he is quick to point out that “It’s necessary to prove in plain english and numbers that people of color are being disproportionately targeted, and those numbers need to be recorded.”

Of course, with what is currently going on in our nation, and has spread across much of the world, our reporter saw it as important to follow up with questions regarding Mr.Carpenter’s plans for our local law enforcement in comparison to the Defund the Police Movement. This is his response: “ I wouldn’t say [it is] part of the movement. We still need law and law enforcement. But yes, I support defunding as a matter of public safety.” He later went on to specify how he wished to see some of the current spending being redirected to organized steering committees for each neighborhood comprised of pro-active residents. In his own words, “sort of a Social Outreach Worker.” 

Although this candidate’s main focus seems to be very much on the law enforcement side of things, as should perhaps be expected of an ex cop, he also shared some intricately detailed plans on his vision for Clifton Forge’s sustainable future, which unfortunately could not all be included in this article to ensure our readers’ attention remain with us. 

“Our environment plays heavily into my plans for supporting our local economy,  Nothing happens without money, and Clifton Forge is one of the most naturally beautiful places I’ve ever seen.” Ed, who is born and raised in New York, seems to have a very economical eye on the environment, and also expresses that his idea is to follow the governor’s lead in moving to green energy as a way to keep our natural spaces pristine and as a way to more effectively deliver Services and goods to our city. 

If elected, he intends to court Dominion Energy and Appalachian Power, in hope that they would consider building one of their new wind farms off our coast, stating he wants our people to benefit from the growth industry and jobs green energy offers.

Of course this sort of plan often comes with worries and questions from the public, one being a concern for the natural beauty of the area. But the mayoral candidate has told our reporter there is no need to worry, comparing the structures that need to be raised to implement his plans for a greener Clifton Forge to that of the Eiffel Tower in Paris, in that people were not in favour of it at first, but that it now is a major tourist attraction. However, we need to point out that the iconic tower was built as an entrance to the Exposition Universelle 1889 and was to be disassembled in 1909. It also never had any intended function besides that of a monument to art and engineering, which we hope isn’t the case with the wind turbines and solar stations the candidate is proposing for our town. 

Again, he points to the benefit for local industry and economics to implement green energy as well as a zero waste policy, claiming it will create more well paying jobs. And, as a last statement regarding his environmental policies, providing the business community buys into his plans, he hopes to be able to go fully green somewhere between 2035 and 2050, and sees that smaller goals, like coming up to emission standards, can be reached as early as 2035. 

And there, dear readers, you have an actual goal to hold Mr. Carpenter to, should you vote him in as the next mayor.

Mr. Carpenter’s social policies seem to heavily tie into those of public safety, and again points to a need for solutions that are indigenous to our neighborhoods and our community. We must bolster the programs we already have in place and give more hands to help. But he also states that to make this part of his scheme work, growth industries like green energy and tourism bring in a much needed cash flow.

The interview had to be cut short in the end, as Mr. Carpenter is a busy man and seemed in a hurry elsewhere. However, the Telegraph did manage to get a hold of him for a few final questions regarding his hiring policies and his stance on lgbtqia questions.

In regards to the queer comunity, he let us know that  “As a bisexual man I am my thought are never far from the protection and rights our community has fought so hard for.. I will always support our community in whatever  way I’m able, we’ve made considerable  strides towards equality. But we’re not done yet. ” And he went on to further claim that he has a fair mix in his campaign team and [that] if he is elected to office I will continue hiring people who can offer perspectives that engender equity.

-Caspian Douglas

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